Samsung 840 EVO 

Released August, 2013
  • 1,000 GB
  • 2.5" SATA III
  • 1,000 MB
6.9 Out of 10

The performance of these EVO drives is actually pretty astounding.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)
The quicker they're capable of doing this, the smoother the experience of using your rig will be.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)

SSDBoss Review Our evaluation of the Samsung 840 EVO

read performance

How quickly data is read from the drive

840 EVO
6.6
840 Pro
6.6
HyperX 3K
5.9
4K Random Read, 4K Random Read Access Time and 512K Sequential Read

write performance

How quickly data is written to the drive

840 EVO
6.9
840 Pro
7.0
HyperX 3K
6.9
4K Random Write, 4K Random Write Access Time and 512K Sequential Write

real world benchmarks

How well the drive performs common tasks

840 EVO
7.9
840 Pro
8.1
HyperX 3K
7.8
Windows 7 Boot-up Time, Photoshop Lens Filter and AS SSD ISO Copy

Benchmarks

How well the drive performs on common benchmarks

840 EVO
6.7
840 Pro
6.7
HyperX 3K
6.4
PCMark Vantage and AS SSD Score

6.9

SSDBoss Score

read performance, write performance, real world benchmarks and Benchmarks

840 EVO
6.9
840 Pro
6.9
HyperX 3K
6.6

Benchmarks Real world tests of the Samsung 840 EVO

4K Random Read

840 EVO
318.8 MB/s
SSDNow V300
38.7 MB/s
HyperX 3K
128.52 MB/s

4K Random Write

840 EVO
106.65 MB/s
SSDNow V300
33.3 MB/s
MX300
44.94 MB/s

Windows 7 Boot-up Time

840 EVO
9.3 s
MX100
14 s
840 Pro
7.8 s

Avg. Power Consumption

840 EVO
2.29 Watts
HyperX 3K
2.99 Watts
SSDNow V300
1.81 Watts

4K Random Read Access Time

840 EVO
2.34 ms
SSDNow V300
7.51 ms
MX300
5.56 ms

4K Random Write Access Time

840 EVO
0.78 ms
SSDNow V300
6.46 ms
HyperX 3K
1.94 ms

Reviews Word on the street for the Samsung 840 EVO


9.0
The RAPID mode is designed specifically to help boost random performance and uses spare CPU power and system memory capacity (up to 1GB) to act as another layer of cache.

What People Are Saying Give it to me straight

Performance

TurboWrite does a good job of blurring the lines between MLC and TLC performance, while Samsung's RAPID DRAM cache offers adventurous users a way of getting a taste of high-end PCIe SSD performance out of an affordable TLC SATA drive.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)
The performance story is really good (particularly with the larger capacities), performance consistency out of the box is ok (and gets better if you can leave more free space on the drive) and you've got Samsung's firmware expertise supporting you along the way as well.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)
Crucial's 960GB M500 may just have the edge in terms of pricing, offering 'terabyte-class' drives for less than this hefty EVO SSD, but when it comes to performance Samsung has got it in spades.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)

Capacity

DRAM size scales with capacity, although Samsung tosses a bit more than is necessary at a couple capacity points (e.g. 250GB).
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)
Since the amount of spare area available on the EVO varies depending on capacity, TurboWrite buffer size varies with capacity.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)
Performance is consistently great across all of the EVO capacity points.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)

Speed

The 120GB and 250GB drives on the other hand have only 3GB, which will get filled up a lot quicker.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)
For the most part this will mean you get top-end performance much of the time, as it will only slow down when this cache is filled without any idle time to flush it.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)

Interface

The MEX controller also sees an update to SATA 3.1, something we first saw with SanDisk's Extreme II.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)
But the random 4K performance is nowhere near saturating the theoretical 600MB/s limit the current SATA interface is shackled by and this is where the 840 EVO scores a home run.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)

Price

And given the KingSpec 1TB is still retailing at a far higher price point it puts in perspective just how good the EVO is.
by Tech Radar (Jul, 2013)
If Samsung can keep quantities of the 840 EVO flowing, and keep prices at or below its MSRP, it'll be a real winner and probably my pick for best mainstream SSD.
by Anand-Lal-Shimpi (Jul, 2013)

Specifications Full list of technical specs

storage

Capacity 1,000 GB
Cache 1,000 MB
Interface SATA III
Interface speed 6 Gbit/s
Controller Samsung MEX
Memory type TLC
NAND process size 19 nm
Maximum shock force 1,500G

form factor

Form factor 2.5"
Mfg warranty 3 years
Thickness 7 mm
Weight 53 g

manufacturer performance

Sequential read 540 MB/s
Sequential write 520 MB/s
Random read 98,000 IOPS
Random write 90,000 IOPS
Power consumption (Idle) 0.05 Watts
Power consumption (Active) 0.1 Watts
MTBF 1,500,000 hours
Report a correction

Comments

Showing 2 comments.
I've been hearing how replacing the old mechanical hard drive with an SSD would increase performance of any PC. I wasn't sure how much of an improvement it'd be since I wouldn't be updating the processor. After I put in the SSD it was a whole new world. The laptop booted up in seconds instead of minutes. Applications opened faster and everything was more responsive. Until now I never realized how much the mechanical hard drive bottlenecked the laptop's performance (as opposed to the processor). I don't think adding more RAM can increase performance this much. I bought the 250GB for just $130 from here http://amzn.to/1ric5NU and still have plenty of room to install more softwares.The difference between the mechanical drive and SSD is day and night!
I own a 2008 unibody macbook the aluminium macbook before the macbook pro and I believe it has a sata 1 interface for the hard disk. Does this make the choice between a samsung 840 pro vs evo redundant for me as there will be a bottle neck in speed at the sata interface. If so is there a way around it? If not, do i then just pick up the cheapest ssd i can find knowing that i won't get the best out of it?
comments powered by Disqus